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Pottery studio divides opinion with bum print plates

PUBLISHED: 15:55 22 October 2019

A bum'pkin plate created at Three Peas in a Pot studio in South Lopham. Photo: Submitted

A bum'pkin plate created at Three Peas in a Pot studio in South Lopham. Photo: Submitted

Archant

A pottery studio is causing a stir online with a new service which lets parents decorate handmade plates with imprints of their baby's bottom.

A bum'pkin plate created at Three Peas in a Pot studio in South Lopham. Photo: SubmittedA bum'pkin plate created at Three Peas in a Pot studio in South Lopham. Photo: Submitted

South Lopham-based pottery company Three Peas in a Pot specialises in unique, personalised ceramics, and hosts regular events where customers can create their own clay pieces, decorated to their tastes.

But a new seasonal special offer has caught the attention of people on Facebook, because of the body part used to paint the product.

The 'bum'pkin plate' features a pumpkin motif, created by dunking a baby's bottom in orange paint and pressing it onto a handmade plate.

Three Peas in a Pot owner, Karen Randall, said the idea had gone down a storm, particularly with mothers, and was a "cute and unusual" way to capture a period in their child's life.

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She said: "Making festive decorations out of baby's footprints and handprints has been a huge trend for ages now. Baby's bottoms are something soft and private, so it's a nice way to remember that point in time. It's fun because it's something that could be used to embarrass them when they're teenagers too."

But for some the idea is a step too far, and Ms Randall said the advertising post had received its share of criticism.

She said: "Some people, mainly men, have said they find it weird, which is fair. Each to their own. The bottom line is that in this day and age things can be misconstrued and men are maybe more aware of things like that. It depends what you think is cute."

Making a bum'pkin plate costs £12 to £15 and includes the paint, printing session and the chance to add personalised decorations such as names and dates.

Once the paint is applied, the plate is baked in a kiln to avoid any unexpected cracks forming.

For Ms Randall, the process is a reminder to spend quality time with family.

She added: "The first plate we made was with my grandson. One side is perfect, but he kept squeezing one of his bum cheeks so it's a lopsided pumpkin. It's very cute."

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