Search

Police got me - now I'm doing bird!

PUBLISHED: 14:45 24 April 2008 | UPDATED: 14:30 14 July 2010

The nesting blackbirds in the wheel arch of a police vehicle.

The nesting blackbirds in the wheel arch of a police vehicle.

When one mum looked for the best place to bring up her kids she couldn't have picked a safer spot.

Plumping for 24-hour security and a set of state-of-the-art blues and twos, she decided put all her eggs in one basket - on the back wheel of a patrol car in the compound at Norfolk police headquarters.

When one mum looked for the best place to bring up her kids she couldn't have picked a safer spot.

Plumping for 24-hour security and a set of state-of-the-art blues and twos, she decided put all her eggs in one basket - on the back wheel of a patrol car in the compound at Norfolk police headquarters.

Eagle-eyed mechanics at Norfolk Constabulary's operational command centre at Wymondham found the nesting blackbird four weeks ago in the wheel arch of the 4x4 patrol vehicle.

After seeking advice from the Constabulary's wildlife liaison officers and the RSPB, workers will have to leave the nest undisturbed until the fledgling birds have flown the nest - or breach wildlife conservation laws.

Wildlife liaison officer PC Garth Coupland said: “It's not the first time this has happened and I'm sure it won't be the last. Nesting birds should always be left undisturbed or you run the risk of the parent abandoning its young.

“Fortunately on this occasion the mum chose a vehicle that's not yet fit for the road anyway so no-one is losing out. Hopefully it will leave us with another satisfied customer - albeit a feathered one.”

The Volvo XC60 is in the process of being adapted for police use. Work will continue when officers are confident the birds are no longer at risk.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Wymondham and Attleborough Mercury

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists