Search

Let the quiet times roll...

PUBLISHED: 08:20 31 January 2008 | UPDATED: 14:24 14 July 2010

Attleborough mayor Vera Dale at the skateboard park.

Attleborough mayor Vera Dale at the skateboard park.

Attleborough is pioneering an innovative scheme that could result in it having one of the quietest skateboard parks in the country.

The initiative began as a move to improve safety at the £90,000 park by boxing in the existing wooden ramps to prevent children clambering underneath them.

Attleborough is pioneering an innovative scheme that could result in it having one of the quietest skateboard parks in the country.

The initiative began as a move to improve safety at the £90,000 park by boxing in the existing wooden ramps to prevent children clambering underneath them.

As metal sheeting was used, it was then necessary to fill the void to deaden any noise made by youngsters banging against the panels. But initial plans to pack the space with soil were quickly discarded as too labour intensive.

However, instigator Gary Szabo, of the Attleborough Safer Neighbourhood Team, decided to surf the internet to see if he could find an alternative. And he struck lucky by contacting home energy efficiency firm Mico Services of Norwich, which pumped in polystyrene normally used to fill cavity walls along with PVA glue to set it rigid.

Spokesman Paul Simmons said: “It is the first skateboard park we have done, and when Gary approached us I did some research and found other companies have had similar ideas to reduce the sound.

“I like to think it is something we can expand.”

The town council had installed an acoustic barrier, after initial complaints about noise from neighbouring residents in Station Road, shortly after the skate and BMX park opened at the recreation ground in April 2004.

And Mayor of Attleborough, Vera Dale, believes that their method of soundproofing ramps could be adopted by other communities.

“We are trying to do what we can to keep everybody happy - the kids and all the people who live nearby because it is an asset for the children and we don't want complaints.

“We are hoping to have one of the quietest skateboard parks and I can certainly hear the difference as the sound is really deadened, so using insulation could be a new trend!”

Mr Szabo, who is a police community support officer, said the project was an excellent example of partnership working with Attleborough firm Eastern Attachments providing the metal cladding free of charge.

Local high school students will also be decorating the ramps and acoustic barrier as an art project, to make the site more attractive.

“The skateboard park is for the children and we want to get more of them involved in taking ownership of the park,” he explained.

Mr Szabo said Breckland Council was planning to take sound levels at the site to evaluate the scheme's success.

Most Read

Latest from the Wymondham and Attleborough Mercury

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists